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Stories about Privacy

22 July 2015

Netizen Report: You Can’t Encrypt, But We Can Spy

"...the revelations have touched a nerve with certain Global Voices community members who are now virtually certain that their own communications devices were infected and monitored using Hacking Team spyware."

18 July 2015

President Putin Signs Russian ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ Into Law

Vladimir Putin signed the "right to be forgotten" search engine law into force, while publicly coming out in support of "minimal restrictions" for the Russian Internet.

14 July 2015

In Sweeping Effort to Spy on Civil Society, Macedonia Broke Its Own Privacy Laws

"When such a government wiretaps you, it means that you are on the right track," says NGO worker Xhabir Deralla.

13 July 2015

Serbian Authorities Take Control of A Man's Facebook Account Following Alleged Threats Against PM Vucic

Police in Serbia seem to have overstepped boundaries in search and seizure proceedings, taking over a personal Facebook account without a court order.

11 July 2015

Legalizing the Great Firewall: China's New Cyber Security Law Would Codify Censorship, Shutdowns

A new comprehensive cyber security law in China would legalize censorship, authorize network shutdowns, and make real-name registration mandatory.

10 July 2015

Mexico Was Hacking Team's No. 1 Client for Spyware

At least 14 Mexican states and government agencies had contracts with Hacking Team, the Italy-based spyware company. But only some of them have constitutional authority to monitor citizen communications.

Digital Citizen 3.3

Digital Citizen is a biweekly review of news, policy, and research on human rights and technology in the Arab World.

23 June 2015

No More Internet: Website Models Effect Of ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ on Russian Search Engines

A new website created by Russian advertising executives asks Russian users to imagine what search engines will look like in 2018—if the “right to be forgotten” bill becomes law.

11 June 2015

Digital Citizen 3.1

Digital Citizen is a biweekly review of news, policy, and research on human rights and technology in the Arab World.

Russia Moves Forward on ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Bill Despite Industry Protests

Lawmakers insist on adopting the new legislation that would require search engines in Russia to delete links to information and content online based on user requests.