Tal Pavel

Contributor profile · 15 posts · joined 9 April 2009 · RSS feed for  » Tal Pavel RSS feed for » Tal Pavel

View all contributors »

Dr. Tal Pavel is an expert in Middle Eastern and Islamic World usage of the internet. He holds a Ph.D. in Middle Eastern Studies from Bar Ilan University. His thesis examined the governmental restrictions and changes concerning internet usage in Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates between the years 2002 and 2005.

Dr. Pavel’s background also includes an in-depth knowledge of Information Systems Development. He occupied various key positions as a Software Project Manager and Software Systems Analyst in various major financial and other business institutions in Israel.

Dr. Pavel is a fellow researcher at the Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies and at Netvision Institute for Internet Studies (Both in Tel Aviv University).

http://www.middleeast-internet-monitor.com

Email Tal Pavel

Latest posts by Tal Pavel

3 January 2010

The Internet in post-Saddam Iraq

The status of the Internet in Iraq, regarding both governmental policies and usage, underwent a fundamental change following Saddam Husayn’s deposal in 2003. Still, as is true with so many other features of Iraqi life, Iraq does not constitute a single, homogenous unit with regard to the Internet. Along with...

6 November 2009

Read this post.

On-line Social Networks in Syria

Syria was among the last countries in the Middle East to introduce the Internet. On February 24, 1996, the Syrian Telecommunications Establishment (STE) received permission from the prime minister’s office to do so, and to serve as the body responsible for the Country Top-Level Domain Code (sy.). Two weeks later,...

21 September 2009

Read this post.

The Power of 140 Characters: Twitter in the Middle East

The massive, sustained protests in Iran this past month against the regime’s apparent falsification of the presidential election results was enabled by widespread employment of new communication technologies. Among them is Twitter, the micro-blog which enables its users to distribute short messages of no more than 140 characters (‘Tweets') via...

17 September 2009

Read this post.

Once again, Syria bans Facebook

Editor's Note: Facebook has been blocked in Syria consistently for the past two years; therefore, the statement that a ban will be “reintroduced” is incorrect. The linked article from  ‘Al Quds Al Arabi',” which has since been removed, did not actually claim that Syria planned to reintroduce a ban.  The...

7 September 2009

The Other Voice: Women in the Cyberspace Discourse in the Middle East and Islamic World

http://www.dayan.org/Women%20and%20the%20internet.pdf Tel Aviv Notes, Dayan Center, Tel Aviv University – 30 August 2009. In recent years, the Internet has become a swift and accessible means of communication, thanks in part to the proliferation of personal blogs and, even more recently, micro-blogs (through “Twitter”).  Users are now able to transmit short...

1 September 2009

Liberia government sites are off, and nobody cares

On the night of August 24th. S.W.A.T hackers (probably Iranian team) penetrated 19 governmental web sites including almost all ministries. Most of the sites were down for maintenance for almost three days. Almost all government sites in Liberia fell for days. But when gargbage covers the streets of the capital...

11 April 2009

Read this post.

France: '3 Strikes’ Internet piracy law defeated in parliament

France's parliament rejected Hadopi (la Haute Autorité pour la diffusion des œuvres et la protection des droits sur internet) bill on Thursday (09.04.2009) with the ruling UMP party failure (21-15) to approve the law. The law proposed two warnings and then, after a third violation, disconnection from the Internet for...