Oiwan Lam

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Am now a free lance researcher, translator and editor.

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Latest posts by Oiwan Lam

2 July 2014

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Hundreds of Pro-Democracy Protesters Arrested in Hong Kong After Half-a-Million-Strong March

Protesters staged a sit-in in the city's business district following a rally of half a million people demanding democratic elections free of China's influence.

20 June 2014

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Hong Kong: Massive DDoS Attacks Continue, Targeting Pro-Democracy News Site

Days after a massive DDoS attack on a citizen-led online voting system, news sites Apple Daily Hong Kong and Taiwan were paralyzed by hackers.

17 June 2014

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Hong Kong Voting Site Suffers Massive DDoS Attack Before Civil Referendum

Thirty hours after testing their online system, Hong Kong University's voting site endured the largest distributed denial of service attack in its history.

31 May 2014

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Censors On, China Still Doesn't Want Anyone Talking About Tiananmen Square

Estimates of the death toll from June 4, 1989 range from a few hundred to the thousands. The Chinese government has prohibited all forms of discussion online or offline since.

28 May 2014

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China to Perform Security Inspections for Tech Products

A new policy will give Chinese authorities a legal basis to pressure technology companies and online service providers to remove "illegal" products -- like circumvention tools -- from the marketplace.

21 February 2014

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Xu Zhiyong and the Long Road for China's Human Rights Activists

Oiwan Lam argues that the conviction of human rights activist Xu Zhiyong, a pioneer of civic organizing online, is emblematic of the new era of government repression towards Chinese activists.

11 February 2014

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China: Prostitution Crackdown Reveals Mass Mobile Surveillance Abuses

A feature on China Central Television that traced the pathways of sex trade workers and clients indicates that the Chinese government is using mass surveillance over mainland mobile networks.