Oiwan Lam

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Am now a free lance researcher, translator and editor.

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Latest posts by Oiwan Lam

21 February 2014

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Xu Zhiyong and the Long Road for China's Human Rights Activists

Oiwan Lam argues that the conviction of human rights activist Xu Zhiyong, a pioneer of civic organizing online, is emblematic of the new era of government repression towards Chinese activists.

11 February 2014

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China: Prostitution Crackdown Reveals Mass Mobile Surveillance Abuses

A feature on China Central Television that traced the pathways of sex trade workers and clients indicates that the Chinese government is using mass surveillance over mainland mobile networks.

21 January 2014

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China: Free Ilham Tohti — Support Ethnic Reconciliation

Ilham Tohti, founder of Uyghur Online and a moderate advocate for ethnic autonomy policy in China was arrested on January 15. Supporters are advocating for his release online.

3 January 2014

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Chinese Netizens (and Political Discourse) Migrate to WeChat

With pro-government voices successfully dominating Weibo, WeChat has become the most important platform for public opinion making in mainland China.

17 December 2013

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In Tibet and Uyghur Regions, Internet Blackouts Are the Norm

In Uyghur and Tibetan minority regions of western China, authorities routinely shut down the Internet in response to protests and rioting.

1 December 2013

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Lifting the Lid on China's Censorship

Recent studies on Internet censorship in China focus primarily on "opinion leaders" -- individuals with high influence on social media platforms -- but fail to include community-based journalism efforts.

13 November 2013

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China: Over 100,000 Weibo Users Punished for Violating ‘Censorship Guidelines’

Tens of thousands of Sina Weibo users are being punished for posting "personal attack comments" or re-publishing messages posted by other users. Welcome to China's ever-broadening battlefield of online censorship.