Mahsa Alimardani

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Mahsa Alimardani is an Iranian-Canadian Internet researcher. Her focus is on the intersection of technology and human rights, especially as it pertains to freedom of expression and access to information inside Iran. She holds a Honours Bachelor of Arts and Science in Political Science from the University of Toronto, and is completing her Masters degree in New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam.

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Latest posts by Mahsa Alimardani

21 July 2014

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Fear, Love and Iran's Favorite Internet Enemy (it's Facebook)

On July 13, eight young Iranians were dealt long prison sentences for their activities on Facebook. Activists both in and outside the country know little more about the case.

19 June 2014

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Iran's Internet Under Hassan Rouhani: Hope and Disillusionment as Narenji Bloggers Face Prison Sentence

What explains the recent moves to tighten controls within Iran’s cyberspace alongside Rouhani’s liberal Internet ethos? Mahsa Alimardani and Fred Petrossian explain in this exclusive #longread for GVA.

17 March 2014

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The Iran Expert May Not Exist, But the Persian Blogosphere Does

Understanding the Internet in Iran isn’t easy. A new study illuminates trends in the Persian blogosphere since 2008, providing a helpful tool in understanding broader social shifts both on and offline.

11 February 2014

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Iran on the Day to End Mass Surveillance

On the "Day We Fight Back", one digital rights group urges the world not to forget that pervasive surveillance has long been part of everyday life in Iran.

22 October 2013

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Rouhani’s Tweets Leave Users Wondering: Does Real Change Lie Ahead?

Iran's new president has become a regular Twitter user, despite the fact that the site, along with Facebook and countless other sites, remain blocked inside the country. Could this be a sign of bigger changes for Iran's Internet?