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Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's international rights director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Katitza holds a Bachelor of Law degree from the University of Lima, Peru.

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Latest posts by Katitza Rodriguez

5 June 2014

How the NSA Violates International Human Rights Standards

Under NSA surveillance programs, the US government has violated international human rights doctrine and even its own laws. Know the facts and learn how you can reclaim your digital privacy.

12 May 2013

Peruvians To President: Our Digital Rights Are Non-Negotiable

Peruvian NGOs have launched a campaign asking President Ollanta Humala Tasso to set clear, non-negotiable limitationss to ensure that Peruvians' fundamental rights in the TPP are respected. The treaty could threaten Internet user's rights to free expression and access to information online, increase controversial aspects of Peruvian copyright law, and restrict the ability of Peru's Congress to engage in domestic law reform to meet the evolving IP needs and realities of Peruvian citizens and their growing technology sector.

1 May 2013

TPP: Biggest Threat to Global Internet Since ACTA?

The United States and ten governments from around the Pacific region will soon meet to hash out the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement (TPP). Negotiations of the agreement have been secretive from the beginning of the process, but based on leaked documents and the undemocratic nature of the entire process, advocates have every reason to be alarmed about the copyright enforcement provisions contained in this multinational trade deal.

6 February 2013

Surveillance Camp III: On the Expanding Online Security Market in Latin America

Recently, we wrote about how companies throughout the world increasingly face political and legal pressures to assist governments in their surveillance efforts and the many ways in which the private sector is increasingly playing a role in state surveillance. In December 2012, EFF's Surveillance and Human Rights Camp in Brazil built upon this discussion and focused a spotlight on the privatization of public security, states funding surveillance initiatives, and the lack of quantifiable research on security markets in Latin America. Here is what we learned.

Surveillance Camp II: Privatized State Surveillance

This is the second in a series of posts mapping global surveillance challenges discussed at EFF’s Surveillance Camp in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Several Global Voices Advocacy Members actively participated in the meeting. This post is a summary of what we learned.

31 January 2013

International Privacy Day: Anti-Surveillance Success Stories

January 28 marked International Privacy Day. Different countries celebrated this day calling attention to their own events and campaigns. This year, EFF is honoring the day by sharing some advocacy strategies utilized by human rights advocates and activists from Argentina, the UK, Canada, and the United States, that have helped to defeat overreaching surveillance proposals that threaten civil liberties.

Surveillance Camp I: Mapping Strategies to Counteract Online Spying in Latin America

This is the first in a series of posts mapping state surveillance challenges in Latin America and lessons learned at EFF's State Surveillance Camp in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

27 September 2012

Privacy Rights Activism in Latin America

Throughout Latin America, new surveillance practices threaten to erode individuals' privacy, yet there is limited public awareness about the civil liberties implications of these rapid changes

3 March 2012

Keep the Pressure On: Canadian Online Surveillance Bill on Pause, But the Fight Continues

Last Saturday, the Canadian government announced it would put proposed online surveillance legislation temporarily “on pause” following sustained public outrage generated by the bill. Since its introduction two weeks ago,...

2 March 2012

Mexico Adopts Alarming Surveillance Legislation

The Mexican legislature today adopted a surveillance legislation that will grant the police warrantless access to real time user location data. The bill was adopted almost unanimously with 315 votes...