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Ben Wagner

Dr. Ben Wagner runs the Centre for Internet & Human Rights at European University Viadrina and is a Visiting Fellow at TU-Berlin and Vrije Universiteit Brussel. His research focuses on freedom of expression, surveillance technology & Internet foreign policy and has been published in Politics, Telecommunications Policy, JITP and the International Journal of Communications.

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Latest posts by Ben Wagner

11 October 2011

What it is and why it matters: Developing Internet Policy at the IGF 2011 in Nairobi

There are many reasons why the Internet Governance Forum that took place last week in Nairobi was completely impossible: A lack of interest from established players who have become weary of the forum and the format, a long stream of stakeholders who couldn't afford to fly to Africa and ongoing United Nations orchestrated debates on the future of the IGF. Even so, thousands of people traveled to the United Nations office in Nairobi to discuss the future of internet policy.

13 January 2011

Is the Tunisian internet censorship regime shutting down?

Following persistent widespread protests in Tunisia in recent days and the impending general strike tomorrow, Tunisian President Ben Ali held a speech on the state television chanel Tunisie7 this evening...

12 December 2010

ICANN TLD censorship mechanisms hidden in procedural details of Applicant Guidebook

In increasingly oversizied legal & policy documents,  it can take some digging to find the real issues presented within. The proposed Final Version of ICANN's gTLD Applicant Guidebook is no...

25 June 2009

Study: Deep Packet Inspection and Internet Censorship

The academic debate on deep packet inspection (DPI) centres on methods of network management and copyright protection and is directly linked to a wider debate on freedom of speech on the Internet. The debate is deeply rooted in an Anglo-Saxon perspective of the Internet and is frequently depicted as a titanic struggle for the right to fundamentally free and unfettered access to the Internet. This debate is to a great extent defined by commercial interests. These interests whether of copyright owners, Internet service providers, application developers or consumers, are all essentially economic.